A Small Farm in Maine...

A Small Farm in Maine...

Maybe it’s in my head, but it seems that more and more people are looking to both live more cheaply and responsibly. In part, that stems from the fact that driving anywhere today costs five dollars – the bus is cheaper – but it also has to do with the advancement in technology and horticulture. Those two things seem at odds, but they’re not. And a few decades back Terry Silber, who was once a Boston-based magazine designer, wrote a book detailing her working a farm and the way she acquired knowledge to retreat from the city.

Not everyone’s going to have the same sort of fortune detailed in A Small Farm in Maine, it’s just not possible. What’s more, finding a plot of land in anywhere with a house built on it for a ridiculously low price isn’t likely. But during the sixties, it wasn’t an impossibility. That being said, while the book details how to make a go of commercial farming, there’s eventually going to be a need for the urbanized version of this book when inner-cities eventually deflate to the point that everywhere’s Detroit or Cleveland. And no, I don’t differentiate greatly between those two places.

Anyway, Silber’s book is as much narrative and charming as it is instructive. There aren’t watering ratios and the like included, but there are broad strategic plans – some surprisingly market focused – discussed herein. Written such a ways back, there’s bound to have been advancement in running farms like this, but A Small Farm in Maine’s a pretty charming read.